Lake Tahoe, Nevada … Lake Tahoe, California

We were sitting in the hot tub the other night with a couple that spend the winter in Carson City for the sole purpose of skiing. This was a new one to us, most people we meet are trying to get away from the snow but this couple, who live in Michigan but find it warmer in Carson City, come here to ski out near Lake Tahoe. Lake Tahoe is only a half hour drive from our RV Park so we decided to take a drive out there and see what it was like.

Lake Tahoe’s surface elevation is 6,225 ft and it is located along the border between California and Nevada, west of Carson City. Its depth is 1,645 ft (501 m), making it the second deepest lake in the United States and the sixth largest lake by volume in the United States, behind the five Great Lakes.

We first saw the lake from the Nevada side.

Lake Tahoe, Nevada

Lake Tahoe is home to a number of ski resorts and summer outdoor recreation areas. Snow and skiing are a significant part of the area’s economy and reputation. The Nevada side also includes large casinos such as Harrahs and Hard Rock.

We had a hard time finding a place to take a picture of the lake on the California side since it appears to be surrounded by houses, but I was finally able to take a picture through the locked fence of a playground.

Lake Tahoe, California

In keeping with my last few blogs on filming locations of movies and TV shows I thought it was only fitting to tell you that The Ponderosa Ranch of the TV series Bonanza was located on the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe. The 1974 film The Godfather Part II used the lakeside estate Fleur de Lac, on the California shores, as the location for several scenes.

The 2014 film Last Weekend used a lakefront home on the west shore of Lake Tahoe as the primary location for its interior and exterior shots. The house, built in 1929, was also the site for the exteriors for A Place in the Sun starring Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift.

I’m really going to have to watch some of these movies!

Until next time …

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